Archive for Space Coast Chapter

Workshop: The Great American Novel: TL;DR, Writing for Social and Web in the age of Brevity

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

The Great American Novel: TL;DR, Writing for Social and Web in the age of Brevity
Presented by: Jeff Stevens, Assistant Web Manager, UF Health

@kuratowa l slideshare.net/kuratowa l #FPRA16WK5

TL;DR: an acronoym meaning “too long; don’t read” (used often on comment boards)

Americans currently consume about 11 hours of media daily- 23% percent is social. In a thrilling workshop, XX discussed creative a voice for your brand and how to translate it to the brief world of web and social, where you’re lucky to hold the attention of consumers for more than two minutes.

Voice, tone and style

  • Voice: A brand’s personality. What does it sound like when you talk to people? What is your brand and what isn’t your brand?

  • Tone: How do you talk to people in different situations?

    • Funny vs. Serious

    • Formal vs. Casual

    • Respectful vs. Irreverent

    • Enthusiastic vs. Matter of Fact

  • Style: Punctuation, Style, Abbreviation, Titling, Spelling,

    • Speciality language is included here.

    • Use of singular “they” is becoming more popular in most styles.

  • Examples/Resources of excellent brand guides:

General Tips For Social and Web

  • Keep it brief. 79% of users scan pages, 16% read pages.

    • We get too verbose with our websites and we need to tone it down. What are consumers looking for?

    • You’re competing with the scroll on social. Most people are not going to click “read more” on Facebook unless you’ve captured their interest.

      • Optimum post length according to study- 40 characters on Facebook & 110 characters on Twitter.

  • Deeper content. When writing more content, use websites and for more engagement, use instant article publishing on facebook (when you read an article, but never actually leave the Facebook app).

  • Avoid jargon.

    • Speak in a language that your consumers recognize and can find.

    • Grammar counts. It can make or break your message.

  • Resources:

    • Writerack.com – a website that breaks out longer pieces into twitter “chunks.”

Tips for writing for the web:

  • Write for understanding.

    • Avoid vague language open to misinterpretation.

  • Write for accessibility.

  • Writing for translation- are international audiences able to translate?

  • BREAK IT UP- headings and subheading. Chunk your content into logical areas

  • Use bulleted lists- easier for scanning.

  • Focus your content. Most important at top and least important at bottom.

    • “Crazy Egg” scans your content to figure out where people stop scrolling on your page.

  • Avoid layout location specific content.

  • Use active voice.

  • Avoid synonyms.

    • Consistent language makes it easier for translators to pick up.

  • Be brief, but be clear.

  • Never underline text on the web- people may think it’s a link.

  • Write for your keywords. (headers, subheaders, in the content)

  • Never use “click here”- hyperlink a whole sentence. Also helps with SEO so google knows what the link is. Embedding the YouTube video is preferable.

  • Optimize for social: “specify a sentence so it says “tweet this” or at a glance short copy. (highlight points or quotes)

Resources:

  • Slickwrite.com: Takes your copy and shows you areas that are not common vernacular.

  • Readability-score.com: Reviews your content to see the reading grade level.

Writing for Social

  • Organic reach mean shared content.

  • Virality means content quality vs. clickability (must meet together).

  • Curiosity gap:People are hardwired to understand more behind an unclear headline. Intrigue them enough to “fill the gap.”

    • Facebook doesn’t like this. Just last week they announced that they tweaked their algorithm and they now “look for click bait and take it off the news feed.”

    • In other words, write clear, specific and informative posts.

  • Use the imperative: take action. Be immediate and in the moment.

  • Posts should be about learning:

    • “How to” “Help” “Beginners Guides” “Learn in Five Minutes”

  • Ask questions! Studies show it doubles engagement

  • Name dropping works well too. Familiar brands, celebs etc.

  • Use numbers:

    • Example: Buzzfeed writes lists.

    • Headlines with odd numbers have 20% higher click-through.

  • Keep it casual:

    • Be a person. Use slang.

  • Emojis can help with shorter character space. (be careful of how emojis differ on various devices)

  • Hashtags: great for getting into existing conversations. Be sure to look at other ways people might interpret it.

    • Ritetag.com helps determine a good hashtag by name.

Final takeaway:

  • Know when to break the rules.

  • Some things might not work for your audience.

  • Complete A/B Testing- refine your content, tone and timing.

  • For websites- use google analytics experiments to see what layouts your audience likes the most.

StevensJeff Stevens has 15 years of experience in web and social communications at the University of Florida and in branding and graphing design with Union Design & Photo. He believes in the power of helping people connect and solving design and content challenges together. As assistant web manager at UF Health, he is responsible for content and social strategy and information architecture for patient care websites and advises on the 700 sites that make up their web presence.

 

 

Breakout 3A: 9 Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

9 Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017
Presented by: Arik Hanson, Principal, ACH Communications

Arik Hanson shared his opinion, based on months of research, on where social media is heading in 2017 in the breakout session Nine Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017.

#1: Less is the new more. The new strategy for social posts is “less is more.” In other words, you don’t need to post multiple times a day! If you can pull together a small social advertising fund, then posting 2 “boosted” posts a week means your content will appear all week long with less work.

Target and Sharpie are both examples of this “dark” advertising (AKA no posts on their feed, but yet always on YOUR feed).

#2: Could the all-video news feed be a reality? YES! It certainly seems to be headed that way. According to the research Arik showed, the number of videos Facebook published in June was twice as many as April.

Facebook Live is a good example of how the platform is pushing more video content. Brands like Oreo and Dunkin Donuts are on board! In the 9 posts Oreo had in July, 7 of those were videos.

Why does it make sense for brands?

  • Best ad targeting platform on the social web.

  • Numbers are through the roof.

  • Adding new functionality all the time (Facebook Live, 360 videos).

  • Huge engagement rates.

#3: Will Instagram lose its “cool” factor? (Arik thinks so.)

Instagram shot up to 400 million users from 2010 to 2015. They slowly began allowing  brands to advertise, and then finally late last year, they opened their ad platform up to all businesses. I don’t know about you, but I’ve noticed these ads and felt a tinge of annoyance.

Here’s why it’s going to lose the “cool” factor:

  • Users visit Instagram for a mental break- not brand advertising.

  • Those brand engagement rates- they’re about to take a hit.

  • Ads will get more likes, but fewer of the more valuable comments/tagging.

#4: Live social video will lead to deeper brand engagement. Live streaming through platforms like Periscope or Facebook Live can bring consumers access to things they may not normally have. For example, Mayo Clinic streamed a live video of a colonoscopy, while a world-class physician discussed the process and answered questions on the spot!

Interviews won’t always work though, so get creative. And remember, the internet likes weird, crappy stuff (like the IHOP Facebook Live pancakes on a beach- look it up for a good laugh).

#5: The emojis heydey is over (for brands). We use emojis to communicate with our friends and family, and to convey certain emotions in a simple, funny way. Brands are trying to get on board with this and failing.

While some brands can make it work, most brands are clunky and don’t understand how to use them properly. Arik provided examples of brands who overcomplicated it with emoji messages that became impossible to decode. Speak the language your customers are using and keep it simple!

#6: LinkedIn publishing will help close the gap between leadership and employees.

CEOs publishing on LinkedIn is becoming a bigger trend. It’s reaching the right audience and humanizes them in a way other communications haven’t. Since it’s a professional network, more leaders will begin joining.

#7: Relying on 3rd-party vendors to produce podcasts:

Why will they outsource?

  • Brands don’t have skill set in-house

  • Agencies aren’t offering/don’t have skill set either.

  • Content more compelling when created by experts.

  • Professional companies can produce a polished and finished podcast.

#8: More Pinterest. Less Snapchat. Pinterest doesn’t get the credit, but a lot of people use it. People on pinterest are building boards then buying. For some companies, Pinterest is a huge traffic-driver to website

  • Why not Snapchat?

    • Few meaningful metrics

    • Not super-intuitive for brands

    • Hard for brands to do right

  • Why more Pinterest?

    • One of the better traffic-driving social sites

    • Long tail traffic

    • Requires less time/energy to maintain

    • More bottom-line results (intent to buy)

#9: Expect more brands to start employing 360-degree photos.They are more engaging in most cases and they provide a richer, deeper experience.

  • Why don’t we see it yet?

    • It’s still early – just launched in June.

    • Brands think you need a 360 camera, but the pano camera on your phone works fine.

    • Lack of perceived need.

#10 (bonus): Feed stopping interactive content: GIFs. With all the advertising cluttering social platforms, companies need to get creative with content that “stops the scroll.” Gifs are a great example of content that most consumers will stop to engage with.

Final take away: “Be creative to cut through the clutter and use the technology to your advantage.”

HansonlArik C. Hanson is the principal of ACH Communications, and an award-winning communicator with more than 20 years of experience in digital marketing, corporate communications and PR. Over the years, he’s worked with Fortune 500 clients like Select Comfort, General Mills and Walmart, as well as regional clients like Starkey, Allina Health and Andersen Windows & Doors. His PR blog, Communications Conversations, has also been recognized as a “must read” by PRWeek and PRWeb.

 

 

Dillin Keynote Address: Rescue, Rehab & Release: Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

Dillin Keynote Address: Rescue, Rehab & Release: Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy
Presented by: Jill Kermes, Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment

In a moving Dillan Keynote Address Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy, Jill Kermes shared the challenges SeaWorld faced after the film Blackfish aired on CNN, what changes the company made following the controversy and why communication matters more than anything.

Jill was thrown into the Blackfish controversy immediately upon accepting her position as Chief Corporate Affairs Officer at the well-known facility. The passion Jill has for SeaWorld and its animals was evident as she told the crowd three facts about the organization that many people may not know:

  • Largest rescuer of animals in the U.S.
  • Conducts and publishes animal research studies.
  • Funds animal conservation projects on every continent.

Not surprisingly, the press hasn’t covered these facts recently. In fact, the negative exposure SeaWorld experienced in the past years has overshadowed the company’s mission.

Challenges:

  • Changing Public Attitudes: SeaWorld initially taught the general public about Orcas, which led to Orcas becoming a beloved animal.

“SeaWorld created a movement and needed to keep up with the changed mindsets,”

Since, millennials were becoming the mainstream generation, their opinion of SeaWorld had a major effect. According to research:

  • 78% want to learn something new when they travel.
  • 90% will likely switch brands (even with the same price/quality) if it supports a cause.

  • 92% of millennial moms want to buy a product that supports a cause.

  • 65% households have a pet.

  • Negative Campaigning Against Our Brand: During the controversy, advertising against SeaWorld became reflective of negative political campaigns. The film Blackfish was created by animal activists who had been against them for years. Despite being riddled with errors, it resonated with the general public and they began to see opinions change. Getting it on Netflix was a smart move, since it reached a broader customer marketplace. As a result, they began seeing a lot of the negativity on social channels.

“Corporate brands cannot defend their brand by running a negative campaign against the activists.”

  • Social media, advertising and PR were not enough: At first, SeaWorld focused on unscripted, organic videos and blogs to respond to the negative exposure. They wanted their voice to be heard and to spread a positive story. However, this wasn’t making much of a difference. They also faced the issue of many blogs being published to major media outlets (i.e. Huffington Post) without being asked to comment.

Finally in 2015, they moved to paid media, because they wanted to make sure opinion leaders had the details of their message. Data began to show they were moving the needle on public opinion, but when the ads went down, so did the positive support.

Changes:

  • Solution: Creating & Telling Your Own Story.

In the wise words of Don Draper from Mad Men, “If you don’t like what’s being said, then change the conversation.”

SeaWorld realized that they needed to listen to the public and make major changes.

“It was at this point,” Jill expressed emotionally, “that we announced we would not breed Orca Whales at SeaWorld anymore.”

They also announced they would change theatrical performances to a more engaging and informative documentary-style experience with the Orcas. In the same breath, they announced they were partnering with the Humane Society to focus on important issues including commercial whaling and the drastic loss of sharks in our oceans.

  • Being Heard: and moving public opinion. Once the barrier of Orcas was removed, people began changing their minds in a positive way about SeaWorld. In studies they conducted following the announcement, they found that 81% of millennials and 87% of California elites were favorable to SeaWorld. From there, their reputation continued to improve.

Why communication matters more than ever:

Communications both internally and externally is vital to an organization. Jill clarified that it’s dialogue vs. monologue. In other words, we need to humanize communications coming from a company. It needs be a two-way street!

What can you do?

Listen to the survey research and react to the public. In SeaWorld’s situation, they had to understand how the public attitudes were changing and then make adjustments to let them know they were listening.

In order to understand public opinion and tell our company stories, professional communicators should have a seat and be consulted along the way of decision making. And sometimes, we need to respond with actions not just slogans.

KermesJill Kermes has a background in political and corporate litigations communications and crisis management. She served as Jeb Bush’s communications director during his time as governor, and worked in the D.C. offices of Ketchum and Public Strategies (now Hill & Knowlton Strategies). She was vice president of brand and corporate communications for Volkswagen of America, as well as the primary spokesperson for Bridgestone during the company’s high-profile tire recall. She is from Safety Harbor, Florida, and graduated from American University.

 

Breakout Session 2D: Crisis Communications 101

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

Crisis Communications 101
Presented by: Kyle Parks, Principal, B2 Communications

“The best crisis management defuses the situation before it becomes a major issue.”

In the casual and informative breakout session 5 Keys to Communicating in a Crisis, Kyle Parks with B2 Communications shared valuable steps to managing crises, emphasizing ways to successfully communicate and find resolutions. He also gave tips for creating a dynamic crisis plan and handling the media.

1.     Address the Issue. When an unexpected situation happens at your company, don’t shy away from facing the issue head on. Kyle shared the story of the Jim Walter Resources mining accident Sept. 23, 2001, and that the first internal reaction was, “we’re shutting the gates and not speaking with the media about this.” Many of us may feel this way when confronted with a crisis, but ignoring the issue could make things worse.

It’s also important to befriend your company’s lawyers in these situations. Get to know them and help them understand the basics of modern crisis communications. If the CEO of your company is listening to anyone, they’re listening to the lawyer, so having their support is invaluable.

2.     Show You Care. Don’t just say, “We’re care deeply about this.” DO something tangible that displays you care about the issue and that you’re taking concrete steps to fixing it.

3.     Take Action. Don’t wait for the problem to resolve itself. If you don’t already have a plan in place, then take action and get the word the out internally so everyone is on the same page. If you work for an agency, then be there with your client finding the solution.

4.     Fix The Problem. As stated earlier, be sure to take tangible steps toward fixing the crisis whenever possible and SHOW the public that you are doing this. If you’re already getting bad press, then write a press release outlining what you’re doing to handle the issue. Then you can post it to your website, share it on social and boost it! Counter the bad press with your response to their articles and communicate with your audience/customers.

5.     Be ready next time! There’s always a better way to handle a crisis. As the communications representative at your company, it’s important to lead the discussion and review of what went well vs. what went wrong. If you don’t already have a crisis plan, then create one. If you do have a plan, then amend it.

“A crisis plan is only as good as whether you use it or not.”

 What goes into a crisis communications plan? How can you prepare?

  • Keep it simple. Realistically, no one is going to read a 30-page plan.
  • Make a list of the top 3-5 situations likely to occur and create a simple bulleted list of how you handle it. You don’t have to think of every scenario, but this will help your team stay on the same page during a crisis.
  • Make it a logistical plan for communicating externally and internally.
  • Create a phone and/or email tree within the company.
  • Determine who your audience is and how you can reach them.
  • Get your client (if an agency) or head of the company on board with your plan.

Tips for handling the media during a crisis.

  • Keep it short: Media want the facts, so give those to them and embrace the silence.
  • You don’t have to answer a question as long as you have a good reason.
  • NOTHING is off the record. If you haven’t already, then it’s important to do media training with your spokesperson to prepare them for interviews. Remind them that if they don’t want it published, then they shouldn’t say it during a media interview.

I’ve listed the top two questions from the Q&A session below:

Q: How can we manage a crisis when there’s multiple parties/companies involved? Esp. when there may different approaches.
A: Form the relationship before something happens and discuss the approach together. Review previous situations and how they could have gone better. If there’s no way to plan this ahead of time, then be ready to mitigate.

Q: What are the best ways to leverage social media in a crisis?
A: Be succinct and short while still saying something with value. Make it real, make it specific. Discuss something tangible. Be ready for comments and manage those. Don’t spend all the time in a crisis to counter the crazy posters out there. Mitigate it and explain to your followers. Know that the majority of people understand your mission and point.

 

KparksKyle Parks is a principal of B2 Communications, one of the top public relations agencies in the Tampa Bay area. Parks entered the PR industry after a distinguished career in journalism, which included senior editing and reporting positions with the Tampa Bay Times. In addition to his work at B2 Communications, he has handled crisis communications for a deadly coal mining accident, a violent employee strike and serious environmental problems.

 

Joe Curley Rising Leader Award Class of 2016

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Congratulations to the winner of the Joe Curley Rising Leader Award - Rhonda Leiberick, APR from the Central West Coast Chapter!

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Congratulations to the entire Joe Curley Rising Leader Class of 2016!

FirehouseSubsLizAnderson

Liz Anderson Jacksonville Chapter

 

Corrie Benfield headshot

Corrie Benfield Tampa Bay Area Chapter

 

LaurenDeiorio final head shot

Lauren DeIorio Ocala Chapter

 

AngelicaDeluccia_headshot

Angelica DeLuccia Morrissey Space Coast Chapter

 

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Erin Igram NW Florida Coast Chapter

 

Erin Knothe

Erin Knothe Dick Pope/Pol County Chapter

 

Cindi Lane

Cindi Lane, APR Volusia/Flagler Chapter

 

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Rhonda Leiberick, APR Central West Coast Chapter

 

Zoe Linafelt

Zoe Linafelt Capital Chapter

 

JoeyMazzaferro_FPRAGainesville-1

Joey Mazzaferro Gainesville Chapter

 

Vianka McConville

Vianka McConville Orlando Area Chapter

 

Nicole Stacey

Nicole Stacey Pensacola Chapter

 

PR2D2′s “Tour of Chapters” Video

FPRA’s very own PR2D2 visited all 15 chapters this past year. Check out the video highlighting his journey.

PR2D2 video screen shot

Presidents’ Luncheon Chapter Awards

Annual Conference

Congratulations to this year’s President’s Luncheon Award Winners!

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Chapter of the Year
Gainesville Chapter (Amelia Bell, APR, CPRC – President)

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Chapter President of the Year
Andi Mahoney, APR (Northwest Florida Coast Chapter)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Accreditation & Certification
Southwest Florida Chapter (Heidi Taulman, APR – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Communications
Capital Chapter ( Jan Dobson, APR, CAE – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Community Service
Dick Pope/Polk County Chapter (Amy Wiggins – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Financial Management
Ocala Chapter (Jennifer Lowe – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Image Awards
Northwest Florida Coast Chapter (Andi Mahoney, APR – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Image Awards
Pensacola Chapter – Gordon Paulus, APR – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Leadership Development
Orlando Area Chapter (Kerry Martin, APR – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Membership Development
Gainesville Chapter (Amelia Bell, APR, CPRC – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Professional Development
Space Coast Chapter (Tessa Friederichs – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Special Event Planning
Central West Coast Chapter (Melissa Link – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Student Development
Southwest Florida Chapter (Heidi Taulman, APR – President)

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Florida Public Relations Association President’s Award for Most Improved Chapter
Jacksonville Chapter

Congratulations to all the winners!

Rising Leader Award Winner

Congratulations to the 2015 Rising Leader Award Recipient

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Rebecca Crisafulli
Space Coast Chapter

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Congratulations to the Rising Leader Class of 2015

Elizabeth Austin, MPS Nature Coast Chapter
Kelli Carter Northwest Florida Coast Chapter
Rebecca Crisafulli Space Coast Chapter
Estella Gray Tampa Bay Chapter
Julie Hall Orlando Area Chapter
Alisha Kinman Gainesville Chapter
Elaine McClain Ocala Chapter
Jeremy Piper Central West Coast Chapter
Carin Campbell Smith Treasure Coast Chapter
Stefanie Stricklin Capital Chapter
Stefany Strong Volusia/Flagler Chapter
Brandi Welk Pensacola Chapter
Tiffany Whitaker Southwest Florida Chapter

Congratulations to these fine young professionals for being presented as nominees by their local chapters. We know we can expect great things from each one of them as rising FPRA Chapter leaders.

Rising Leader Nominees

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Congratulations to the nominees for the 2015 Joe Curley Rising Leader Award, who will all be recognized at annual conference in August! Here is the second group of members of this year’s class – the remaining members will be featured in July!

 

EMcClainElaine DeIorio McClain, Marion County Board of County Commissioners
Ocala Chapter

From her chapter’s nomination: “In her budding career in public relations and FPRA membership, Elaine has demonstrated the highest commitment to the profession with her keen judgment, strategic approach and attention to cost-effectiveness.”

 

 

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Julie Hall, AAA
Orlando Chapter

From her chapter’s nomination: “She is a go-getter, an engaged board member and an absolute pleasure to work with – a mix of qualities that gives her incredible potential in our Association.”

 

 

 

BWelkBrandi Welk, Council on Aging of West FL, Inc
Pensacola Chapter

From her chapter’s nomination: “In her second year as a professional member, Brandi joined the board and quickly took an active role as VP-Networking. She has scheduled numerous events and promoted them on the chapter’s Facebook page and Twitter. She attended Annual Conference and has represented the chapter at a State board meeting.”

 

 

TWhitakerTiffany Whitaker, Pushing the Envelope
Southwest Florida Chapter

From her chapter’s nomination in her words: “I am committed to representing and growing our industry through my involvement in FPRA and the community as well as serving the company I work for and my clients.”

 

 

BCrisafulliRebecca Crisafulli, McBride Marketing Group
Space Coast Chapter

From her chapter’s nomination in her words: “Leadership is a personal passion and FPRA has provided me with opportunities to lead at all levels.”

November – Networking Around the State

While November marks the beginning of the busy holiday season, there’s always time for learning. Thanks to Florida Public Relations Association chapter events, public relations professionals throughout the state have the opportunity to learn some great tips to get them through this years holiday buzz. Learn more about the professional development and networking opportunities available near you below, and #ThinkFPRA.

Haven Hospice Public Relations Manager
November 1, 2013, Nature Coast Chapter (Hernando, Fla.)
http://www.fpranaturecoast.org/

‘Tis The Season For Holiday Story Pitches
November 5, 2013, Southwest Florida Chapter (Fort Myers, Fla.)
http://fpraswfl.org

Disney PR pro Munroe discusses “Stories from Fantasyland”
November 12, 2013, Volusia – Flagler Chapter (Daytona Beach, Fla.)
http://fpravolusiaflagler.org/

Professional Development Luncheon
November 15, 2013, Ocala Chapter (Ocala, Fla.)
http://www.fpraocala.org/

Trust in the 21st Century: Why and How Media Ethics Will Change
November 20, 2013, Central West Coast Chapter (Sarasota, Fla.)
http://cwcfpra.com/

How We Are Working to Establish Florida as the #1 Travel Destination in the World
November 21, 2013, Gainesville Chapter (Gainesville, Fla.)
http://fpragainesville.com

NASA Public Affairs – Past, Present and Future
November 21, 2013, Capital Chapter (Tallahassee, Fla.)
http://fpra-capital.org/

Moving People to Action Through Direct Marketing
November 21, 2013, Orlando Area Chapter (Orlando, Fla.)
http://fpraorlando.org

Topic/Date TBD, Space Coast Chapter (Viera, Fla.)
http://www.spacecoastfpra.com/

Topic/Date TBD, 2013, Jacksonville Chapter (Jacksonville, Fla.) 
http://fpra-jax.org/

Topic/Date TBD, Treasure Coast Chapter 
http://www.fpratreasurecoast.com/