Archive for 2016 Annual Conference

Workshop: The Great American Novel: TL;DR, Writing for Social and Web in the age of Brevity

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

The Great American Novel: TL;DR, Writing for Social and Web in the age of Brevity
Presented by: Jeff Stevens, Assistant Web Manager, UF Health

@kuratowa l slideshare.net/kuratowa l #FPRA16WK5

TL;DR: an acronoym meaning “too long; don’t read” (used often on comment boards)

Americans currently consume about 11 hours of media daily- 23% percent is social. In a thrilling workshop, XX discussed creative a voice for your brand and how to translate it to the brief world of web and social, where you’re lucky to hold the attention of consumers for more than two minutes.

Voice, tone and style

  • Voice: A brand’s personality. What does it sound like when you talk to people? What is your brand and what isn’t your brand?

  • Tone: How do you talk to people in different situations?

    • Funny vs. Serious

    • Formal vs. Casual

    • Respectful vs. Irreverent

    • Enthusiastic vs. Matter of Fact

  • Style: Punctuation, Style, Abbreviation, Titling, Spelling,

    • Speciality language is included here.

    • Use of singular “they” is becoming more popular in most styles.

  • Examples/Resources of excellent brand guides:

General Tips For Social and Web

  • Keep it brief. 79% of users scan pages, 16% read pages.

    • We get too verbose with our websites and we need to tone it down. What are consumers looking for?

    • You’re competing with the scroll on social. Most people are not going to click “read more” on Facebook unless you’ve captured their interest.

      • Optimum post length according to study- 40 characters on Facebook & 110 characters on Twitter.

  • Deeper content. When writing more content, use websites and for more engagement, use instant article publishing on facebook (when you read an article, but never actually leave the Facebook app).

  • Avoid jargon.

    • Speak in a language that your consumers recognize and can find.

    • Grammar counts. It can make or break your message.

  • Resources:

    • Writerack.com – a website that breaks out longer pieces into twitter “chunks.”

Tips for writing for the web:

  • Write for understanding.

    • Avoid vague language open to misinterpretation.

  • Write for accessibility.

  • Writing for translation- are international audiences able to translate?

  • BREAK IT UP- headings and subheading. Chunk your content into logical areas

  • Use bulleted lists- easier for scanning.

  • Focus your content. Most important at top and least important at bottom.

    • “Crazy Egg” scans your content to figure out where people stop scrolling on your page.

  • Avoid layout location specific content.

  • Use active voice.

  • Avoid synonyms.

    • Consistent language makes it easier for translators to pick up.

  • Be brief, but be clear.

  • Never underline text on the web- people may think it’s a link.

  • Write for your keywords. (headers, subheaders, in the content)

  • Never use “click here”- hyperlink a whole sentence. Also helps with SEO so google knows what the link is. Embedding the YouTube video is preferable.

  • Optimize for social: “specify a sentence so it says “tweet this” or at a glance short copy. (highlight points or quotes)

Resources:

  • Slickwrite.com: Takes your copy and shows you areas that are not common vernacular.

  • Readability-score.com: Reviews your content to see the reading grade level.

Writing for Social

  • Organic reach mean shared content.

  • Virality means content quality vs. clickability (must meet together).

  • Curiosity gap:People are hardwired to understand more behind an unclear headline. Intrigue them enough to “fill the gap.”

    • Facebook doesn’t like this. Just last week they announced that they tweaked their algorithm and they now “look for click bait and take it off the news feed.”

    • In other words, write clear, specific and informative posts.

  • Use the imperative: take action. Be immediate and in the moment.

  • Posts should be about learning:

    • “How to” “Help” “Beginners Guides” “Learn in Five Minutes”

  • Ask questions! Studies show it doubles engagement

  • Name dropping works well too. Familiar brands, celebs etc.

  • Use numbers:

    • Example: Buzzfeed writes lists.

    • Headlines with odd numbers have 20% higher click-through.

  • Keep it casual:

    • Be a person. Use slang.

  • Emojis can help with shorter character space. (be careful of how emojis differ on various devices)

  • Hashtags: great for getting into existing conversations. Be sure to look at other ways people might interpret it.

    • Ritetag.com helps determine a good hashtag by name.

Final takeaway:

  • Know when to break the rules.

  • Some things might not work for your audience.

  • Complete A/B Testing- refine your content, tone and timing.

  • For websites- use google analytics experiments to see what layouts your audience likes the most.

StevensJeff Stevens has 15 years of experience in web and social communications at the University of Florida and in branding and graphing design with Union Design & Photo. He believes in the power of helping people connect and solving design and content challenges together. As assistant web manager at UF Health, he is responsible for content and social strategy and information architecture for patient care websites and advises on the 700 sites that make up their web presence.

 

 

Breakout 3A: 9 Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

9 Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017
Presented by: Arik Hanson, Principal, ACH Communications

Arik Hanson shared his opinion, based on months of research, on where social media is heading in 2017 in the breakout session Nine Social Content Trends to Watch in 2017.

#1: Less is the new more. The new strategy for social posts is “less is more.” In other words, you don’t need to post multiple times a day! If you can pull together a small social advertising fund, then posting 2 “boosted” posts a week means your content will appear all week long with less work.

Target and Sharpie are both examples of this “dark” advertising (AKA no posts on their feed, but yet always on YOUR feed).

#2: Could the all-video news feed be a reality? YES! It certainly seems to be headed that way. According to the research Arik showed, the number of videos Facebook published in June was twice as many as April.

Facebook Live is a good example of how the platform is pushing more video content. Brands like Oreo and Dunkin Donuts are on board! In the 9 posts Oreo had in July, 7 of those were videos.

Why does it make sense for brands?

  • Best ad targeting platform on the social web.

  • Numbers are through the roof.

  • Adding new functionality all the time (Facebook Live, 360 videos).

  • Huge engagement rates.

#3: Will Instagram lose its “cool” factor? (Arik thinks so.)

Instagram shot up to 400 million users from 2010 to 2015. They slowly began allowing  brands to advertise, and then finally late last year, they opened their ad platform up to all businesses. I don’t know about you, but I’ve noticed these ads and felt a tinge of annoyance.

Here’s why it’s going to lose the “cool” factor:

  • Users visit Instagram for a mental break- not brand advertising.

  • Those brand engagement rates- they’re about to take a hit.

  • Ads will get more likes, but fewer of the more valuable comments/tagging.

#4: Live social video will lead to deeper brand engagement. Live streaming through platforms like Periscope or Facebook Live can bring consumers access to things they may not normally have. For example, Mayo Clinic streamed a live video of a colonoscopy, while a world-class physician discussed the process and answered questions on the spot!

Interviews won’t always work though, so get creative. And remember, the internet likes weird, crappy stuff (like the IHOP Facebook Live pancakes on a beach- look it up for a good laugh).

#5: The emojis heydey is over (for brands). We use emojis to communicate with our friends and family, and to convey certain emotions in a simple, funny way. Brands are trying to get on board with this and failing.

While some brands can make it work, most brands are clunky and don’t understand how to use them properly. Arik provided examples of brands who overcomplicated it with emoji messages that became impossible to decode. Speak the language your customers are using and keep it simple!

#6: LinkedIn publishing will help close the gap between leadership and employees.

CEOs publishing on LinkedIn is becoming a bigger trend. It’s reaching the right audience and humanizes them in a way other communications haven’t. Since it’s a professional network, more leaders will begin joining.

#7: Relying on 3rd-party vendors to produce podcasts:

Why will they outsource?

  • Brands don’t have skill set in-house

  • Agencies aren’t offering/don’t have skill set either.

  • Content more compelling when created by experts.

  • Professional companies can produce a polished and finished podcast.

#8: More Pinterest. Less Snapchat. Pinterest doesn’t get the credit, but a lot of people use it. People on pinterest are building boards then buying. For some companies, Pinterest is a huge traffic-driver to website

  • Why not Snapchat?

    • Few meaningful metrics

    • Not super-intuitive for brands

    • Hard for brands to do right

  • Why more Pinterest?

    • One of the better traffic-driving social sites

    • Long tail traffic

    • Requires less time/energy to maintain

    • More bottom-line results (intent to buy)

#9: Expect more brands to start employing 360-degree photos.They are more engaging in most cases and they provide a richer, deeper experience.

  • Why don’t we see it yet?

    • It’s still early – just launched in June.

    • Brands think you need a 360 camera, but the pano camera on your phone works fine.

    • Lack of perceived need.

#10 (bonus): Feed stopping interactive content: GIFs. With all the advertising cluttering social platforms, companies need to get creative with content that “stops the scroll.” Gifs are a great example of content that most consumers will stop to engage with.

Final take away: “Be creative to cut through the clutter and use the technology to your advantage.”

HansonlArik C. Hanson is the principal of ACH Communications, and an award-winning communicator with more than 20 years of experience in digital marketing, corporate communications and PR. Over the years, he’s worked with Fortune 500 clients like Select Comfort, General Mills and Walmart, as well as regional clients like Starkey, Allina Health and Andersen Windows & Doors. His PR blog, Communications Conversations, has also been recognized as a “must read” by PRWeek and PRWeb.

 

 

Dillin Keynote Address: Rescue, Rehab & Release: Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy

Blogger: Sarah Hansen (Space Coast Chapter)

Dillin Keynote Address: Rescue, Rehab & Release: Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy
Presented by: Jill Kermes, Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment

In a moving Dillan Keynote Address Communicating a Purpose-Driven Brand in Controversy, Jill Kermes shared the challenges SeaWorld faced after the film Blackfish aired on CNN, what changes the company made following the controversy and why communication matters more than anything.

Jill was thrown into the Blackfish controversy immediately upon accepting her position as Chief Corporate Affairs Officer at the well-known facility. The passion Jill has for SeaWorld and its animals was evident as she told the crowd three facts about the organization that many people may not know:

  • Largest rescuer of animals in the U.S.
  • Conducts and publishes animal research studies.
  • Funds animal conservation projects on every continent.

Not surprisingly, the press hasn’t covered these facts recently. In fact, the negative exposure SeaWorld experienced in the past years has overshadowed the company’s mission.

Challenges:

  • Changing Public Attitudes: SeaWorld initially taught the general public about Orcas, which led to Orcas becoming a beloved animal.

“SeaWorld created a movement and needed to keep up with the changed mindsets,”

Since, millennials were becoming the mainstream generation, their opinion of SeaWorld had a major effect. According to research:

  • 78% want to learn something new when they travel.
  • 90% will likely switch brands (even with the same price/quality) if it supports a cause.

  • 92% of millennial moms want to buy a product that supports a cause.

  • 65% households have a pet.

  • Negative Campaigning Against Our Brand: During the controversy, advertising against SeaWorld became reflective of negative political campaigns. The film Blackfish was created by animal activists who had been against them for years. Despite being riddled with errors, it resonated with the general public and they began to see opinions change. Getting it on Netflix was a smart move, since it reached a broader customer marketplace. As a result, they began seeing a lot of the negativity on social channels.

“Corporate brands cannot defend their brand by running a negative campaign against the activists.”

  • Social media, advertising and PR were not enough: At first, SeaWorld focused on unscripted, organic videos and blogs to respond to the negative exposure. They wanted their voice to be heard and to spread a positive story. However, this wasn’t making much of a difference. They also faced the issue of many blogs being published to major media outlets (i.e. Huffington Post) without being asked to comment.

Finally in 2015, they moved to paid media, because they wanted to make sure opinion leaders had the details of their message. Data began to show they were moving the needle on public opinion, but when the ads went down, so did the positive support.

Changes:

  • Solution: Creating & Telling Your Own Story.

In the wise words of Don Draper from Mad Men, “If you don’t like what’s being said, then change the conversation.”

SeaWorld realized that they needed to listen to the public and make major changes.

“It was at this point,” Jill expressed emotionally, “that we announced we would not breed Orca Whales at SeaWorld anymore.”

They also announced they would change theatrical performances to a more engaging and informative documentary-style experience with the Orcas. In the same breath, they announced they were partnering with the Humane Society to focus on important issues including commercial whaling and the drastic loss of sharks in our oceans.

  • Being Heard: and moving public opinion. Once the barrier of Orcas was removed, people began changing their minds in a positive way about SeaWorld. In studies they conducted following the announcement, they found that 81% of millennials and 87% of California elites were favorable to SeaWorld. From there, their reputation continued to improve.

Why communication matters more than ever:

Communications both internally and externally is vital to an organization. Jill clarified that it’s dialogue vs. monologue. In other words, we need to humanize communications coming from a company. It needs be a two-way street!

What can you do?

Listen to the survey research and react to the public. In SeaWorld’s situation, they had to understand how the public attitudes were changing and then make adjustments to let them know they were listening.

In order to understand public opinion and tell our company stories, professional communicators should have a seat and be consulted along the way of decision making. And sometimes, we need to respond with actions not just slogans.

KermesJill Kermes has a background in political and corporate litigations communications and crisis management. She served as Jeb Bush’s communications director during his time as governor, and worked in the D.C. offices of Ketchum and Public Strategies (now Hill & Knowlton Strategies). She was vice president of brand and corporate communications for Volkswagen of America, as well as the primary spokesperson for Bridgestone during the company’s high-profile tire recall. She is from Safety Harbor, Florida, and graduated from American University.

 

Workshop: Effective Media Interaction

Blogger: Vickie Pleus (Orlando Area)

Effective Media Interaction
Presented by: John Zarrella, President, JZMedia

  • Takeaways: Comprehend the value in media training; understand the importance of protecting the image; find comfort on camera

  • Media training is not always going to be perfect, but it certainly can be a benefit

    • Have a good understanding of how it works

      • It’s the whole package: your presence, how you deliver message, where you deliver, how you dress…all these go into the package you’re trying to present to the client, company

      • You are the spokesperson; your responsibility is to get the message out or protect the interest of the org/ company

    • Don’t agree to interview immediately

      • What would you like to discuss?

        • If you are client, call your agency first before giving interview

      • Create outline

      • Discuss questions with other staff

      • Ask reporter:  What questions will you be asking me?

        • Does not always work

        • Reporter may say “general question about ____ (subject)”

          • Follow up questions may change anyway, be based on questions they produce

    • Be aware of surroundings, esp. for TV, and how you look

      • Clean desk?

      • Blinds open/closed?

      • Lighting?

      • Outside?

      • What to wear

        • Blues, stay away from warm tones

        • Solid colors, no stripes/no busy patterns

          • No distracting jewelry, dangling earrings

        • Dress for weather

  • Remember your manners – make the reporter comfortable

    • Be polite

    • Offer water

    • Need anything before interview?

      • May not hurt; develop rapport with reporter that’s interviewing you

  • Keep your cool!

    • Interviewer could be challenging

    • Could be an ambush

    • Keeping your cool is the most important thing you can do

      • Always assume the camera is rolling, mics are on

    • Keep it simple

      • Stick to the message

      • Talk in sound bites

      • Don’t go on and on!

        • what you want to get out may be getting lost

It’s not just how you say or what you say, it’s how you present yourself

  • Never lie; don’t make things up

    • Even if the reporter doesn’t catch it, social media will catch it

    • If you don’t know the answer, don’t make it up

      • Get back to them with the answer

      • Have an expert available to you so you may defer if you don’t know the answers

  • Consider media training

    • Interview w/subject to put them at ease

    • Record interview

    • Then “reporter” asks tougher questions

Before interview, after meetings with staff, as you work on outline, that’s where the sound bites come from

  • Don’t try to fill the silences

  • Ok to pause

  • Don’t look defensive

  • Correct incorrect information

    • Correct it on the spot if possible

  • Don’t paraphrase the incorrect information first…simply replace with the CORRECT information

ZarellaJohn Zarrella is president of JZMedia. He was a network news correspondent for CNN for 30 years based in the network’s Miami bureau. His work included coverage of natural disasters, the U.S. Space Program, the environment and major breaking news. After leaving CNN in 2014, he began JZMedia. He continues to report now for CCTV-America, an International network, and does media trainings and public speaking.

 

Breakout 3C: Five Key Tools for Surviving the Modern Crisis

Blogger: Erin Knothe (Dick Pope/Polk County)

Five Key Tools for Surviving the Modern Crisis
Presented by: Ike Pigott, Consultant, Positive Position Media Consulting

In his presentation, Five Key Tools for Surviving the Modern Crisis, Ike Pigott discussed how he discovered his gift was in helping people tell their stories better. There is no true special training or school for dealing with a crisis in your organization. Your experience and your knowledge of the organization is critical to survival, as well as knowing what outcomes you want.

Instead of five key tools, Ike shared six.

Definition

A crisis is when your organization’s reputation is at stake because of an action you did or didn’t take and public perception is negative. Similarly, a definition from the book, Overdrive, defines a crisis as a violation of your organizational vision. It’s something that violates the promises of your brand. Someone saying something nasty on Twitter is not a crisis, so don’t bring out a full scale crisis communication plan every time.

Expectations

Make sure your organization’s leaders know:

  • You are not a miracle worker.

  • Your organization will not come out unscathed. One of the only reasons why someone stops talking about you is because they’re talking about the next scandal. You will still have a scar from the situation, but you survived.

  • Your goal is to be in as positive a position as possible at the end of the day.

Triage

Two types of triage:

  • Assessing the crisis itself – Set expectations for the future so your leadership can understand why you need to take the steps you are planning

    • How hard is the hit? (impact)

    • How deep is the wound? (scope)

      • How long will we bleed? (duration)

    • Assessing the feedback – You can’t address everything, so you need to use your time and effort to address the key messages.

      • Who is saying it? Random twitter user vs New York Times journalist (authority)

      • How far is its reach? Something with 1,000 retweets is more likely to be retweeted than a message you’re trying to get out in response. (spread)

      • How virulent is the claim? How likely is it that people will want to share it? People are likely to share bad news as a result of virtue signaling, which is the idea that you want to be seen as serious about a particular topic. Slate Star Codex has an article about the topic. (stickiness)

      • Assessing the feedback is something you can do all the time. Get your leadership used to you using authority, spread and stickiness to judge how to respond to a situation.

Access

  • Who has the final word? Who is going to approve or veto your decisions?

  • Where does the person who does the approving or vetoing sit in a crisis? Your goal is make sure they know they are in the same room. No one is immune in a crisis, so they need to be a part of the process to expedite decisions and know what is going on.

    • Plan your messaging for one hour, eight hours and five years after the crisis hits.

    • Four questions to ask when developing messaging:

      • Who are you talking with?

      • What do you want them to know?

      • How do you want them to feel?

      • What will they do with that? What is their call to action? Understand the good and bad ways people can use the information you give them.

Outsourcing

  • How many personnel do you have trained?

  • How many do you need?

  • Whole functions

    • Who will your vendors be? Determine what information you need to handle and what you can share with someone else.

Some of work that is easier to outsource is monitoring, including traditional, social and internal, or whole functions. Remember that insourcing is an option to quickly get more people working on work that needs to be accomplished.

To give an example of how a crisis can evolve, Ike used an example of a group of people clapping. When it starts, clapping is somewhat chaotic. As it continues, a rhythm develops and everyone will stop around the same time. In the same way, a crisis is chaotic and you are never going to control the conversation. However, you can guide it to an end.

Tempo

  • The Tweet a Minute

    • You don’t have to have a unique tweet every minute. However, you should be retweeting, pointing back to something on your website or commenting back to a reporter every three to four minutes. People will be more likely to sit back and watch instead of trying to fill the void you’re leaving if you don’t say anything.

    • Make sure you don’t get in Twitter jail by tweeting too frequently during a crisis. Ask your twitter representative who you need to let know when you institute your communication plan so you can tweet uninterrupted.

PigottlIke Pigott is a Positive Position Media consultant. After 16 years in broadcast news, the Emmy-winning reporter branched out into crisis and disaster communications. In addition to consulting through Positive Position, Pigott was instrumental in bringing social media to disaster communications for the Red Cross, and works for Alabama Power in media relations and social strategy. He has presented at dozens of conferences in the United States, Canada and Great Britain.

 

Lunch Session: Listen to the C-Suite

Blogger: Erin Knothe (Dick Pope/Polk County)

Lunch Session: Listen to the C-Suite
Presented by: Alex Glenn, State President, Duke Energy; Moderator – Andy Corty, Publisher, Florida Trend

Note: Illness and flight challenges prevented two panel attendees from participating at the lunch session, but moderator Andy Corty from Florida Trend led an insightful discussion with Duke Energy’s State President, Alex Glenn.

How is public relations organized in the company?

The corporate communications team is centralized. Located all throughout the state, the staff directly reports to a vice president, but also communicates with Alex. They are an integral part of decision making. In addition to various regular meetings, Alex has Monday morning meetings with the Corporate Communications (CC) team and sometimes the Community Relations team to review what happened over the weekend, while also planning for upcoming events.

In regards to Florida’s severe weather, what types of communication plan does the company have?

Two general types of communication plans for emergencies:

  1. Strategic plans for large emergencies, like hurricanes

  2. Reactive plans for individual situations, like floods

    1. For these types of emergencies, tools such as media messages, question & answers, press releases, and specific communication to customers, are used on a situational basis.

How does the CC team work with other departments?

The overall view of the company is the more transparency, the better. The CC team will come up with the needed strategies and language, which is then brought to the Legal department  just to review that everything is up to regulations standards. Bad news is better in your own words than someone else’s, which is one reason why the CC Team is so valuable.

Who are your audiences?

First and foremost is employees. A great company has engaged and enabled employees. The easiest way to undermine that is to not communicate with them. Some of the mediums used are email, video conferences, meeting face-to-face, company intranet and social media.

What media do you use externally?

The types of media being used have changed. JD Power is an important voice to Duke Energy. When Duke Energy and Progress Energy were merging, JD Power said that Progress Energy was a quiet company and Duke Energy was a silent company. While being quiet is typical for the industry – you just do your job and keep the lights on – Duke Energy has worked on stepping out of that label. Now they use TV ads and create their own content on http://illumination.duke-energy.com/. Using stories to humanize the company and encouraging employees to be social media champions has been a culture change.

While the CC team plays a role in publicly visible communication, do they have a role in behind-the-scenes meetings?

Government affairs is mostly present in those silent meetings, but the CC team’s messages are present in all meetings. The talking points they produce are the “north star.”

How has the 24 hour news cycle changed the way you communicate?

Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face. – Mike Tyson

The CC team monitors and reacts as appropriate all times of day. Instead of like in the past where you would gain one and lose one customer, now you can gain one and lose 1,000 customers based on one person’s bad experience that was shared on social media.

With the 24 hour news cycle, how do you prevent the story from getting ahead of you?

It depends on the issue. The first step is to know the facts. You might lose time, but you can’t lose trust.

What is Duke is doing about renewable energy?

Renewable prices are starting to come down, so solar capacity is more possible. In the middle part of the state, the most popular energy usage time is January during the morning hours. Unfortunately, the sun isn’t shining during that time. Solar is intermittent and works for 20-25% of the time. The gamechanger for solar will be affordable energy storage. Duke Energy’s R&D investment is in battery storage. Using solar energy would be a win-win situation. Our carbon footprint goes down and consumers bills are reduced.

What’s the current plan for nuclear energy?

Nuclear energy plants are difficult to build in Florida because natural gas prices are very low and license ability is hard to get. Capital costs of the projects won’t pay off until after 20 years, so the idea is a hard sell for consumers. Unfortunately, no one wants to pay for something that will benefit their children or grandchildren.

What keeps you [Alex Glenn] up at night?

  1. Employee safety – making sure everyone goes home in the same condition they came to work in

  2. Cyber security – It’s a question of if – not when. Duke Energy has 120 million phishing attempts a month. Security plans are in place, with people working 24/7 to work against them.

What are some tips for gaining the CEO’s trust?

  • Have a very deep, thorough understanding of the business. Otherwise, how can you advise?

  • Provide solutions. Don’t just identify the problem, come up with a solution. Explain your reasoning.

  • Tell the truth, even when the person doesn’t want to hear it. If you can’t feel like you can do that, consider if your job is a good fit.

  • Think strategically. Help the business plan specifically and measure it.

What does social media look like for employees?

Employees receive a half day of training, including how to do it and what to stay away from. Only a handful of employees, all from the CC team, have an official twitter handle for the company. Employee social media comments are monitored. Using the company created content, the CC team has made sharing easy and user friendly so employees can become involved in being social media champions.

Have you [Alex Glenn] had media training and what did it entail?

An outside consultant was used to come in for a couple of days of training. Alex commented that more training would be good and staff lower in the chain of command should be getting it too.

Alex Glenn is president of Duke Energy’s utility operations in Florida, serving approximately 1.7 million electric retail customers in central Florida, including metropolitan St. Petersburg, Clearwater and the Greater Orlando Area. He is responsible for advancing the company’s rate and regulatory initiatives, and managing state and local regulatory and governmental relations, economic development and community affairs. Alex has been with Duke Energy (and predecessor companies Progress Energy and Florida Power Corp.) since 1996. Before joining Florida Power Corp., Alex practiced energy law at the international law firm of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP in Washington, D.C.

 

Workshop: Upping Your Presentation Game: Creating an Engaging and Effective Message

Blogger: Alayna Curry, APR (Orlando Area Chapter)

Upping Your Presentation Game: Creating an Engaging and Effective Message
Presented by: Devon Chestnut, APR, CPRC - Communications Manager, Cox Communications
Link to presentation: http://prezi.com/wjqo6y5ax-o6/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy 

As someone who gives presentations on a weekly (and sometimes daily) basis, I was excited to hear and blog about Devon’s workshop on creating an engaging and effective message. I found myself nodding along and wanting to shout AMEN throughout her entire presentation. Many of the tips and tricks she discussed I use on a regular basis and are very helpful in reaching your audience.
Devon opened with a comical “what not to do” video of public speaking from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. The monotone voice of Ben Stein was a perfect example of how to bore your audience to tears. So, what should you do? Here’s four simple steps.
Step 1: Create the story
  • Frame your story. Determine the start and end and then build the story within that. It’s much harder to start from scratch and work from the beginning.
  • Research your audience. Know who you’re talking to, what they already know and what they want to know.
  • Don’t give vague information.You want the audience to leave wanting more because your presentation was so good, not because you left things out. Don’t use acronyms or industry jargon that the audience won’t understand.
  • Avoid information overload. You don’t want the audience to lose the message. Keep it simple and stick to the key topics.
Step 2: Build the story. 
  • Use a similar look and feel throughout the presentation. Don’t use both clip art and photos. Try not to use too many different fonts or colors.
  • Use appropriate text and fonts for the audience. You probably shouldn’t use silly fonts if you’re presenting to your C-suite.
  • Less is more. Don’t use a lot of text. Your presentation is just the support material.
  • Make the investment in good photos and visuals for impact. Keep videos to 60 seconds or less.
  • Proofread. Many newer presentation programs (like Prezi) don’t have spell check as an option.
Step 3: Deliver the story.
  • Work on your delivery and tone. Try not to use a script. If you need a reminder, use notecards with only a few bullets.
  • Avoid distractions. Watch your posture – don’t rock back and forth. Leave loud jewelry at home and don’t use slides with too many effects.
  • Keep eye contact. If this makes you nervous, talk to audience members ahead of time to get comfortable. Find some friendly faces to look to during the presentation.
  • Pay attention to audience engagement. Be aware of their body language. How are they reacting?
  • Mind your time. Get to your presentation early so you can test out technology. It might be helpful to get your own slide advancer that you’re comfortable with.
  • Have a backup plan in case technology doesn’t work. Bring your presentation on a jump drive or print out a PDF.
Step 4: Utilize tools and resources.
During the Q&A time, I shared a tool that I’ve found helpful when giving presentations. SlideShark is an app you can download on your iPad and iPhone. Upload a PowerPoint presentation to the SlideShark website from your computer and then download it to the app on your iPad. Your phone works as the remote and has lots of different features. The best part: once it’s downloaded, you don’t need wifi!
Overall, a very informative session that will help our members give better and more engaging presentations. Great job, Devon!

DChestnutDevon Chestnut, APR, CPRC, is the communications manager for Cox Communications, a communications and entertainment company, providing advanced digital video, internet, telephone and home security and automation services. Chestnut’s role includes managing Cox’s Southeast Region internal communications for more than 1,900 employees working in the states of Florida, Georgia and Louisiana. She also plays a pivotal role on several national company projects and initiatives. In addition, she manages community outreach efforts within the Central Florida markets.

 

Breakout 3D: Millennial Marketing: It Takes 1 to Know 1

Blogger: Brandi Gomez (Pensacola Chapter)

Millennial Marketing: It Takes 1 to Know 1
Presented by: Robert Noberg, Director of Strategy and Research and Nathan King, Business Development Coordinator – The Agency at University of Florida

In the breakout session Millennial Marketing: It Takes to Know 1, The Agency at University of Florida shared insights into the unique characteristics of millennials and how to market to them in an intentional and authentic way through effective channels.

So what is a millennial? Millennials, also known as Generation Y, are individuals born between 1980 and 2000 who are known to be increasingly aware and savvy with up and coming technologies.

Marketing to millennials is an increasingly popular public relations topic, but definitely comes with its challenges. With technology and social channels constantly, how can you market to these individuals?

CHARACTERISTICS OF A MILLENNIAL

  • Absorb information in many different ways, but primarily through their phones

  • Get their news straight from social media

  • Listen to music through streaming apps rather than the radio

  • No longer have cable and instead resort to streaming sites such as Netflix and Hulu

  • They feel an obligation and social responsibility to make the world a better place

  • Impatient and want instant answers

FACTS AT A GLANCE

  • 10,000 Baby Boomers retiring every day

  • 50% of millennials will take a 15% pay cut if the company’s values align with their own

THREE EASY WAYS TO RESEARCH MILLENNIALS

  1. Talk to us

  2. Be authentic and transparent

  3. Incentivize

THREE KEY TAKEWAYS

  1. Don’t stereotype millennials

  2. Talk to millennials through their preferred channels

  3. Be willing to adjust to millennial trends and technologies

The Agency at UF is an auxiliary of the University of Florida which trains students to know what it would be like to work for an agency or brand. They are led by professionals, staffed by students, and inspired by faculty. Learn more at http://theagency.jou.ufl.edu/

TheAgency1lBob Norberg, director of strategy and research at The Agency – a strategic communication firm housed within the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications – has had an extensive career in the private and public sector serving the beverage industry. In his current role, he develops research strategies to meet client objectives and trains students in the art and science of conducting market research with open source and proprietary tools, like MAVY™.

 

TheAgency2Nathan King, business development coordinator at The Agency, is a recent UF graduate. He gives The Agency’s professional staff valuable millennial insight. In his role, Nathan has traveled the nation to tell The Agency’s one-of-a-kind story and win business from brands wanting to better understand the tricky millennial generation.

 

Workshop: Five Apps to Shoot Awesome Videos in 5 Minutes

Blogger: Chris Gent, APR, CPRC (Orlando Area Chapter)

Five Apps to Shoot Awesome Videos in 5 Minutes
Presented by Sarah Redohl, StoryLab

Little videos can have a BIG impact.

Here are five apps to download to your smartphone, available in both the Apple and Android stores.

  1. Legend – animate text in video and GIF
  2. PicPlayPost – create video collages using photos, videos, GIFs and music
  3. Lapse it – capturing time lapse and stop motion videos
  4. Video Scribe – create whiteboard animations
  5. Flipagram – create short photo video stories with your photos, videos clips and favorite music.

50% of your video development should focus on audio quality.

Your Video Toolkit Should Include

Common Rookie Mistakes

  • Not defining goals
  • Shots that make people sick
  • Forgetting good audio
  • Keeping your audience in the dark
  • Making your videos too long
  • Not effectively telling a story

Define Your Goals

  • What is the goal of your video strategy? You must know your goals to set your KPIs and figure out if your video strategy is working or not.
  • What is your ultimate goal? To explain a product or service? Teach your audience something? Improve brand awareness?
  • How do you want them to feel when they watch your video? Entertained? Inspired? Educated?
  • What do you want your audience to do? Buy something? Donate money? Like your page?

Stabilize Your Shots

  • Tripod
  • Variety of distances and angles
  • Don’t shoot vertical video

Getting Good Audio

  • Use your phone’s built-in mic for narration
    • Identify which mic the app is recording, or
    • Buy a handheld mic compatible with your device.
    • Use the in-line mic in your earbuds for interviews
      • Minimizes surrounding noises, maximize speech
      • Frame tightly and make sure the earbuds and cords are out of the shot.
      • Buy a lav ic (Suggested brand: Rodeo SmartLav)

Show Them the Light

  • Look for the brightest spot to film
  • Sunlight is your friend
    • Bright, pure white, and abundant
    • Add light (lamps, overhead lights, torch light)
      • Even out lighting
      • The brightest light source should be at the videographer’s back.

Keep It Short

Video viewership drops significantly after 10 seconds. Keep it short and eye-catching.

Tell a Story

  • Follow a simple plot structure
  • Serve your audience
  • Stay focused on ONE THING

Link to presentation will be posted in 48 hours at http://storylabllc.com/fprasignup

Share your feedback on this presentation at #LittleBigVideo

 

RedohlSarah Redohl is the chief creative strategist of StoryLab, which teaches people to create content on their smartphones. Past clients include professional associations, Fortune 500 companies and national publications. Redohl’s work has appeared in The Washington Post, the Travel Channel, and NPR, among others, and has claimed a handful of regional and national awards. She is also recognized as one of Folio Magazine’s 15 Under 30 young professionals driving media’s next-gen innovation.

Breakout 1C: Livestreaming: Periscope 101

Blogger: Vickie Pleus, APR, CPRC (Orlando Area Chapter)

Livestreaming: Periscope 101
Presented by: Tara Settembre, Blogger, TaraMetBlog.com

@TaraMetBlog tarametblog.com or plusitup.com
Do you Scope? Are you a Scoper? < that’s the lingo!

Takeaway: Livestreaming doesn’t add more work; it enhances what you’re already doing
It’s another part of your planning

    • By 2019 video will account for 80% of all internet traffic
      • No. 2 search engine in the world is YouTube
      • We can do video cheap and easy, that’s the good news
    • Why Livestreaming?
      • Gives people instant access
      • See personalities, see what you’re doing
      • Foster better connection w/ customers
      • Puts face to name, brand, place
      • Allows people to see what you’re seeing
    • Periscope is owned by Twitter
      • Works seamlessly with and streams live on Twitter
      • A live broadcast is called a “Scope”
      • Always make sure it’s shared on Twitter
    • People know it’s not rehearsed on Periscope
      • It’s honest
      • Not faked
      • Humanizes your business; show instead of tell
    • 75% of Periscope users are 16-34 years old
    • 65% are male
      • Most other social platforms are mostly female–are younger males a target demo?
    • Available in 25 languages
      • As you use it, you’ll see participation from various countries
    • Awarded Apple’s App of the Year 2015
    • Don’t worry about editing video
      • Not fancy
      • Not polished
      • People expect lower quality
      • Obviously, less time or less effective
      • But you can practice ahead of time (check surroundings, settings, etc)
    • Good for expanding demo you’re reaching
      • Followers can be watching it, and it shows you’ve gone live on a world map
      • It’s a good customer-service tool
      • Video No. 1 – option: show what you’re seeing, not talking (or voice from behind, such as tour of facility, offices) – forward-facing
      • Video No. 2 – option: back-facing
      • As you record, people type comments, and you can reply
  • Reply is verbal response, not typed▪  You can ignore some comments if you like
        • Like Facebook “Likes,” “Hearts” on Periscope is approval icon; collect the hearts
          • The more hearts you get, the more you’re boosted up in the screen
          • More viewers (as a suggested video)
          • Is it a good scoper? Judge by number of hearts
        • What kind of content should/can be scoped by me or my clients?
          • Products, Demos
          • Q & A with a business executive
          • Behind-the-scenes interview (example, of chef in a kitchen)
          • Live tours (things you’d never see otherwise)
        • You can set up the questions ahead of broadcast, moderate as they’re asked
        • Periscope video is now available indefinitely (link, which can be embedded)
          • Pushed by operation of Facebook Live
          • Can share video later as a tool

    ▪       Video can be embedded, too

        • End of news release
        • Online press room
        • Used to follow up with media who could not attend an event, for example
        • Also can be deleted

    ▪       Usually they are kept up for 24 hours, at a minimum

        • Functionality of the app
          • Location services – make live

    ▪       Do not enable at home

        • Click “share to Twitter” button

    ▪       Twitter account is required to use Periscope

        • Lock button

    ▪       Allows only certain viewers to see video

        • Dry run of video (not live) is smart!
        • Chat feature

    ▪       Inappropriate comment? “Remove” – kick them out of chat

        • Notifies others the person was removed/blocked
          • Shows inappropriate comments are not allowed (sends message)
          • Generally, this won’t happen, but it’s possible (trolls)
          • It’s possible to block followers as well
          • Load title, hit “start broadcast”

    ▪       Make sure it’s right where you want it to be.

    ▪       Is the screen showing your hand? Check your screen.

        • People can follow

    ▪       Though you may have “few” followers, keep in mind many, many more can have access to watch live; measure success by number of joiners

        • Stats available at video’s end: how many people watch, how many joined
        • Followers notified when you start

    ▪       Text alert on phones of followers

    ▪       Followers don’t have to be in the app to know you’re streaming

        • Different from Facebook Live, where you must have app open to be notified
        • Best practices for Periscope

    ▪       Start and end title for Scope with emojis

        • Start and end with an emoji

    ▪       Give heads up on when you’ll be live on Periscope

        • Include in news release
        • Share notification on social media

    ▪       Ask others to share that you’ll be live with their followers

        • “Swipe right” then share with followers; must be done when the feed is live
          • Ask bloggers to share
          • Media reps
          • Colleagues

    ▪       Use #hashtags

        • Though not searchable on Periscope, they are searchable on Twitter

    ▪       As you begin, pause a moment to let followers know you’re live

    ▪       Prepare, but don’t sound scripted

        • Rehearsed? It’s boring for viewers
        • However, prepare as much as you can
        • Using iPad or tablet would allow you to have larger screen (easier to read viewer comments)
        • Vertical is best (desktop users see a switch, it’s not ideal for horizontal)

    ▪       Save every video to your camera roll

        • Saves to camera roll without comments

    ▪       Ideal length: 2-10 minutes

        • It’s acceptable to go live in the same event, separate streaming instances

    ▪       Vs. Facebook Live

        • FB Live works well if you already have a high FB following
        • You can share Periscope link on FB later, if desired
        • FB Live features are bumped up in the news feed
        • When comparing, see which app works best for your community
        • In page settings, enable FB Live feature to use on a page you are an admin for
        • Today Show uses FB Live (as an example)
        • After show, they go live 5 more minutes

    ▪       YouTube competition

        • Expect more livestreaming on YouTube to compete
        • Can upload Periscope>YouTube after saving to cameral, but YTube video typically more polished

     

    TerraTara Settembre is a blogger at TaraMetBlog.com. She is a PR and social media strategist with a master’s degree in journalism and communications from NYU. She has more than 10 years of agency and in-house PR experience. Previously, Tara was the corporate communications manager at World Wrestling Entertainment and a PR manager for The Walt Disney Company. She has been honored by the PRSA of Los Angeles for “Best One-Time Media or Special Event” and received a PR News Platinum PR Award for best video program. In addition, for the past 11 years, Settembre has been a successful lifestyle blogger at tarametblog.com and writer for The Huffington Post, TravelingMom.com and other online outlets.